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Blog: Infoway Connects

A Patient Partner’s Reflections on the Infoway Partnership Conference

Posted on December 5, 2017 by Colleen McGavin

As one of the patient partners awarded a scholarship to attend this Patients Included conference, I was very grateful and pleased to be able to bring a patient lens to the event. We were warmly included and appreciated at the Partnership Conference. Because of my personal experience as a cancer patient who was treated in many care settings over more than a decade, I’m passionate about wanting to see change in how health records are managed and shared in this country, and I was encouraged to see advances being made.

Patient Portals Enable Proactive — Rather Than Reactive — Health Care

Posted on November 16, 2017 by J. Tyler Moss 

My experience with eHealth Saskatchewan’s Citizen Health Information Portal (CHIP) began in the spring of 2016. A request went out to residents of Saskatchewan to sign on to the pilot project; I did, and became one of the initial 1,000 participants.

Digital Health Can Enable Better Health Outcomes

Posted on November 13, 2017 by Nancy Lefebre

With an important focus in health care on person- and family-centered care, the move towards technology seems common-sense. People are using technology to make their lives easier. We have heard time and again, that people want care where they are — in their homes — and they want health care that seamlessly fits in to their lives. To do this successfully, we need to rethink and restructure the way care is delivered and funded, with technology as a key enabler to this. There is tremendous opportunity as we shift toward “home as the hub of care,” to expand the use of digital technology and integrated funding models. 

Making an Impact: The Future of Connected Devices

Posted on November 7, 2017, by Dr. Sunny Kumar

A few years ago, I met with a company that had designed a consumer grade technology to monitor the pattern and frequency of leg muscle contractions during cycling. The information would be fed back in real time to the individuals’ mobile device. The rationale for this was, knowledge of these parameters could improve performance and reduce injury. At the time, I recall thinking this was a “cool” innovation, but with limited impact.

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One Quarter of Canadians Using Connected Objects to Track their Health and Well-being

Posted on September 26, 2017 by Claire Bourget

Internet of Things refers to connected objects that have a variety of uses and a capacity to communicate and transfer data.

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Canadians’ Use of Mobile Health Apps and Connected Devices to Support Health and Well-being Gaining Momentum

Posted on September 19, 2017 by Chad Leaver

Summer theatre festivals across the country attract Canadians and travellers alike to experience the performing arts. Recently, I took in Guys and Dolls — the classic musical at the Stratford festival in Ontario. The reviews were right – an absolute sensation! Spontaneous applause erupted frequently after incredible dance and musical numbers...and every time the audience applauded, I couldn’t help but notice the white-lights, like stars, that illuminated the auditorium. I realized these ‘stars’ (and there were many) were in fact smart connected devices — wearables like watches, wristbands or bracelets — which are used to track health and well-being biometric data.

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Navigating the Realities of Citizens’ Access to their Heath Information: Direct Access to Laboratory Results in Canada

Posted on August 29, 2017 by Chad Leaver

Across the world, citizen’s access to their own health information through secure online tools are becoming a hallmark of modernized health care systems and a catalyst for advancing access to health services and person-centered models of care.

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Has Anyone Asked the Patient?

Posted on August 15, 2017 by Kate Perkins

There is a lot happening in the digital health space — almost too much to wrap our heads around. To ensure clinician uptake, it is essential that digital health solutions and tools can be seamlessly integrated into clinician workflow. But what is becoming increasingly apparent is that the needs of patients are equally important. Since patients are an equal partner in their health care, doesn’t it make sense they have a say in which digital health tools are developed?

Myth: Digital Health Apps Are Not Evidence-based and Do Not Work

Posted on July 18, 2017 by Bobby Gheorghiu

Infoway recently launched a digital health myths busting campaign, and as part of the campaign, we asked you to submit myths you’d like us to bust. One myth you asked us to debunks was, “Digital health apps are not evidence-based and do not work.” In order to tackle this myth, I enlisted the help of a clinician and researcher in the digital health space, who eagerly provided me with his insight. Dr. Kendall Ho is a professor at the Department of Emergency Medicine at the UBC Faculty of Medicine. He was the Faculty’s eHealth Strategy Office Director and his research focuses on digital technologies for innovative clinical practices: telehealth, wearables, health apps, social media, and patient engagement. 

PEOPLE-Centred (DIGITAL) Health

Posted on April  11, 2017 by Cassie Frazer

Who are we in the health system? Are we patients? Consumers? Citizens, clients, Canadians? No matter what you call us – we are people. Unique individuals with unique interests and health care needs; and it is important that we are at the table when decisions about our care are being made.

Positive Patient Experience Leads to Better Health Outcomes and System Sustainability

Posted by Chad Leaver on March 21

Digital health and connected care services are evolving and gaining momentum in Canada. As they do, the link between patient experience and value-based outcomes is critical to both assess opportunities for improvement and determine scalability and integration of connected care solutions into Canadian models of care.

A Look Back at Digital Health Week

Posted on November 29, 2016 by  Shelagh Maloney

Thanks to all who participated in Digital Health Week (Nov. 14-20)! The event was very successful in sparking conversations with Canadians about how digital health is empowering them in moving from patients to partners in their care. Collectively we generated over 4,800 tweets that garnered over 23.8 million impressions! Several themes emerged from these conversations. The two that resonated most with me are 1) the importance of including patients in the design of digital health solutions and 2) the ability of digital health to transform the delivery of care.

State of Digital Health in Canada Tweet Chat

Posted on November 14, 2016 by  Shelagh Maloney

Date: Friday, November 18, 2016
Time: 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET
Where: Twitter at #ThinkDigitalHealth

What Canadians Think about Adolescents Accessing their Electronic Personal Health Information

Posted on November 7, 2016 by Cassie Frazer

As a parent of adolescents, naturally I was curious about the topic at hand — providing adolescents with access to their electronic personal health information (PHI); and I wondered about the perceptions of others in Canada as well. For me, the question was not, “should adolescents have access to their PHI” as I believe this right exists, but rather “how should this access be facilitated” in an electronic health record environment?

Top 10 Reasons for Digital Health

Posted on October 27 by Shelagh Maloney

We live in a digital age and like every other aspect of our lives, Canada’s health system becomes more digital every day. Digital health solutions can be used to book a medical appointment, request a prescription renewal, view health information or consult with a doctor, online. These new technologies are modernizing the health system and making Canadians and their families healthier. Recently we put together a Digital Health Top 10 — what do you think?

Adolescent Access to Digital Health Records — Results of an Environmental Scan

Posted on October 11, 2016 by Cassie Frazer

Have you ever wondered how the “electronic health system” will know who you are and whether or not you have the right to access your personal health information (PHI)? Depending on one’s age, the answers to these questions may vary. As an adult, one may just assume they have a right to their health information; yet a young child will not likely have given these concepts a thought. For individuals aged somewhere in between however, such as a 14- or 16-year-old, having access to one’s own electronic health information may be of increasing interest and importance.

Simplicity, Ubiquity and Affordability Key to Consumer Health Innovation

Posted on September 13, 2016 by Bobby Gheorghiu

Earlier this summer, at e-Health 2016, I had the pleasure of moderating a very interesting and distinguished panel of clinical researchers from British Columbia who described each of their initiatives aimed at providing virtual care for patients with various types of chronic diseases. While the technical solutions that each presented were different, many common threads emerged that should get on the radar of policymakers throughout the country. At the top of the list were these three: simplicity, ubiquity, and affordability.

Who has Access to What? Adolescent Access to Personal Health Information

Posted on August 29, 2016 by Joan Roch

A lot of organizations are interested in giving people more access to their health information. They are building portals and apps so people can have that access.

But a question that always arises is: “Should people under the age of majority be able to access portals in the same way as someone over the age of majority?” Currently, the age of majority is 18 years of age in some provinces/territories and 19 in others. This is the age at which an individual attains full rights and responsibilities in society, such as the right to vote and to consume alcohol.

A telehomecare program enabled Heather to take a more active role in the management of her gestational diabetes red… https://t.co/wRof8ORxGT

by Infoway

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